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Try the New Webcast Software Print E-mail
Written by Jacob Stark   
Thursday, 04 March 2010

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints now offers a software-only option for sending webcasts.

Download now (for Microsoft Windows XP, Vista or 7)

System Requirements:

  • Dual 2 GHz or higher processor
  • 256 MB of RAM or higher
  • Video capture device
  • Microphone
  • Connecting cables (as needed)
  • Broadband internet access

NOTE: You must have an LDS Account to download the Webcast Software.

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LDSTech Forum Will Soon Be Using LDS Account Print E-mail
Written by Cassie McDaniel   
Friday, 26 February 2010

LDS Account provides you with a single user name and password to interact with online LDS Church resources. LDS Account will become the primary authentication method for most Church sites and applications.

The LDSTech forums will be switching to LDS Account in the near future. To help prepare for this migration, we need you to visit the LDSTech Forum Account Migration page to move your forum account to LDS Account. You will have 4 weeks to make this migration.

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Exploratory Testing: A Lost Art? Print E-mail
Written by David Kosorok   
Friday, 19 February 2010

When I was a kid, I would use a hammer to set my tent stakes or to pound nails into two-by-fours to build tree forts. I thought I could use the hammer for anything. If I hit a board hard enough, it would break, and I wouldn’t need to use the saw. If I hit the plywood just right, I could punch a hole through the board without using the drill.

Obviously, using one tool to do it all may get quick results, but it won’t look pretty. Many in the testing industry use a similar single-tool approach, attempting to solve every problem using automated testing. No time? Slap some automation on your software and ship it out the door. No money? Cut down on testers and have an automation engineer do it all.

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Managing Technology Choices Print E-mail
Written by Peter Whiting   
Friday, 12 February 2010

Most technical problems have no shortage of technology solutions. Sometimes there is a clear winner, but it has been my experience that more often, multiple good choices are available. Some of the choices have specific attributes that are favorable, but rarely is one choice a clear winner.

Sometimes team members may have opposing objectives. For example, part of the team may define its success as quickly delivering a solution. Another part of the team may define its success as efficiently operating what was delivered. A solution that favors quick implementation may present a challenge for efficient operations.

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The TDD Experience Print E-mail
Written by Dax Haslam   
Friday, 05 February 2010

Test Driven Development (TDD) is a development process based on very short testing and coding iterations where the test code for a block of functionality always precedes any actual implementation. A test should be written to fail before coding any sort of implementation; this follows the Red-Green-Refactor idea. I have been exposed to TDD in the past year or so and actually practiced it a little without knowing it while working on college projects.

The development team I belong to consists of Christian Hargraves (a strong proponent of TDD) and me. As a team we’ve been trying to do TDD and pair programming at least a couple of times a week. Our pattern is for one developer to write the unit test and create any classes or methods required to simply make the code compile and the test fail. At this point, the other developer takes the helm and does the bare minimum to make the test pass. He then writes the next failing test. The result is that the simplest solution is implemented first. This cycle continues until both developers are confident that the functionality will meet all the requirements and that the tests are all passing. This method of development is often referred to as ping pong programming.

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From Manual to Paperless Processes Print E-mail
Written by Adam Burden   
Friday, 29 January 2010

The concept and advantages of a paperless office were first introduced in 1975, and since that time, the quest to achieve the pure paperless workplace has been ongoing. Despite advances in technology, many of our business processes still include passing paper from person to person.

Tasks such as purchase requests, hiring provisioning, and order tracking are some examples of paper forms that historically require manual handling. These forms that are passed from person to person risk being misplaced, delayed in the depths of a cluttered desk, or even destroyed accidentally. All too often, these are single-copy instances that are not backed up electronically or stored in a central location where it is easily retrievable. There are many theories as to why we haven’t made the change to be paperless, such as the concept of affordances; it appears that paper will be around for awhile longer.

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Newsletter: January 2010
Friday, 22 January 2010

New Year

2010 is shaping up to be a banner year for the community. We have some exciting things planned, including the first LDSTech Developers Conference. Those who are interested in coming to Church headquarters, learning about development tools, and getting to work on volunteer development projects are invited to attend. Please mark your calendar for April 1 and 2. Registration and more details will be available in February.

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Meetinghouse Webcast Overview Video Print E-mail
Written by Jacob Stark   
Friday, 15 January 2010

Meetinghouse Webcast technology provides an alternative to travel for stake conferences, regional conferences, firesides, and training meetings by allowing local units of the Church to webcast these meetings over the internet to other locations.

Learn more by watching the overview video below:

The Camtasia Studio video content presented here requires a more recent version of the Adobe Flash Player. If you are you using a browser with JavaScript disabled please enable it now. Otherwise, please update your version of the free Flash Player by downloading here.

 

 

Additional Resources

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The Evolution of Web Services Development in an RIA World Print E-mail
Written by Bryan Hinton   
Friday, 08 January 2010

Web services have become common place in today’s connected world. Companies like Google, Amazon, eBay, Microsoft, Yahoo, and Twitter expose Web services to allow other developers to build on top of their infrastructure. In the consumer world these Web service APIs have allowed for a variety of fascinating “mash-ups” of data. In the business world, Web services have allowed for greater intra-company and inter-company (Business to Business or B2B) communication. What used to be done through TCP, FTP, and custom file formats can now be done with HTTP and XML.

In the early days of the Internet, a group backed by Microsoft started work on a standard called SOAP, a foundational layer for Web services. In the early days when people talked about building or consuming web services they were inherently talking about SOAP-based web services. Through the years SOAP has continued to evolve. The WS-* family of specifications provides greater support for reliable messaging, transaction control, and security. However, the increased functionality comes with a cost. A common criticism of SOAP is the complexity and overhead that come with it. Supporters have tried to counter these criticisms through better tooling and frameworks to abstract away the underlying complexity.

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Recreation Properties Application Project Print E-mail
Written by Tom Johnson   
Tuesday, 29 December 2009

Although the Church has more than 500 properties, from camps to lodges to ranches, there isn't a single content management system that centralizes all Church property information. Instead, many of the Web sites are independent of one another, inconsistent with each other and often incomplete, and maintained by different groups. When you try to locate a property, it can be hard to see the specific rules, availability, cost, activities, and amenities from one property to the next.

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