Hard-Wired Internet - Type of Cable?

Discussions about Internet service providers (ISPs), the Meetinghouse Firewall, wired and wireless networking, usage, management, and support of Meetinghouse Internet
techgy
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Hard-Wired Internet - Type of Cable?

Postby techgy » Tue Apr 26, 2011 10:07 pm

Our stake is considering moving from a wireless system to a hard-wired Ethernet connection to get the Internet from one side of our stake center to the other. The route would cross the chapel. Although I don't have a distance, I'm guessing it would take somewhere in the neighborhood of 100-200 feet.

My understanding is that a good grade of CAT6 cable can handle a length of approximately 100 meters (300 ft).

I'd like to have some input on this in regards to the type of cable and the maximum length. Has anyone already wired a building and what success did you have?
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russellhltn
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Postby russellhltn » Tue Apr 26, 2011 10:21 pm

techgy wrote:Our stake is considering moving from a wireless system to a hard-wired DSL connection to get the Internet from one side of our stake center to the other.


I'm confused. I'm not sure what DSL has to do with things if you're just trying to get a Ethernet line across the building.

But as for the type of cable, if it's routed in the area above the chapel, firecode may requrie use of cable rated for Plenum use.
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techgy
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Postby techgy » Tue Apr 26, 2011 10:24 pm

RussellHltn wrote:I'm confused. I'm not sure what DSL has to do with things if you're just trying to get a Ethernet line across the building.

But as for the type of cable, if it's routed in the area above the chapel, firecode may requrie use of cable rated for Plenum use.


Agreed. DSL makes no difference and yes, we're looking at an Ethernet run.
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jdlessley
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Postby jdlessley » Tue Apr 26, 2011 11:51 pm

techgy wrote:Our stake is considering moving from a wireless system to a hard-wired DSL connection to get the Internet from one side of our stake center to the other. The route would cross the chapel. Although I don't have a distance, I'm guessing it would take somewhere in the neighborhood of 100-200 feet.

My understanding is that a good grade of CAT6 cable can handle a length of approximately 100 meters (300 ft).

I'd like to have some input on this in regards to the type of cable and the maximum length. Has anyone already wired a building and what success did you have?

The maximum cable run from node to node is 100 meters (328 feet). This includes patch cable lengths in the run and not just the distance from connector outlet to connector outlet. It doesn't matter whether it is CAT5, CAT5e, CAT6, or CAT6A. The line length limit is the same for all these grades of cable and is a signal timing issue and not line loss. The better grades in cable have higher speed ratings (Category 5-100 mbps-100 meters, Category 5e-1 Gigabit/sec-100 meters, Category 6- 3 Gigabit/sec-100 meters, Category 6A- 10 Gigabit/sec-100 meters).

I have wired several buildings. The cost differential between CAT5e and CAT6 cable is marginal when purchased in 500' or 1000' boxes. Since CAT6 is a higher speed rated cable it would better accommodate computer network upgrades. When the Church builds a new building and installs network cable they use CAT6 cable. The biggest cost differential is between riser cable and plenum cable. Plenum cable must be used in many commercial indoor installations. Plenum cable is called for whenever the cable is to be run inside air plenums (and thus the name) or where fire/building codes stipulate its use. The difference between riser and plenum is the cable jacket. The plenum cable jacket is more fire resistant (will self extinguish and not reignite) and will give off less toxic gases when at high temperatures or when burning.

Handling of the cable during installation and terminations are big reasons to use a professional installer since DIYers are more prone to damaging the cable or in making unprofessional (shoddy) terminations which affect network reliablility and speed loss. I suspect that plays a big part in the Church's desire to have the local FM Group provide the network cable installation.

The 100 meter line limit can be overcome by inserting a node in the run. Typically a simple network switch is used. How many can be used serially I have not been able to determine. But I doubt that for any Church unit the maximum run would exceed 200 meters.
JD Lessley
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