Multiple Wireless Laptops - Log Each Other Off

Discussions about Internet service providers (ISPs), the Meetinghouse Firewall, wired and wireless networking, usage, management, and support of Meetinghouse Internet
tperry
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Multiple Wireless Laptops - Log Each Other Off

Postby tperry » Wed Jul 08, 2009 6:20 am

We've put in wireless (n,g,a,b) in our Stake Center. When our Stake Presidency meets, 4 brethren attempt to use the wireless Internet. At least three of them are logged off or fail to connect to the router properly (sometimes all 4). If there is ever only one of these individuals in the room trying to connect, they never have a problem. It's when multiple people attempt using it at the same time.

I've heard a rumor about N wireless devices doing something like this, so I forced their laptop wireless adapters to run only G. It still happens. Three of them have handheld devices with WiFi capability. Those will always connect and won't interfere with the single laptop that successfully connects.

Any help from those much wiser than I would be appreciated!

russellhltn
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Postby russellhltn » Wed Jul 08, 2009 9:23 am

Can you give more details? I assume you're using the Church's firewall. Are you using the routers built into the wireless access points? When a device looses connection, does it loose it's IP address? If not, is it still able to ping the routers? Is it able to ping the Internet (yahoo.com)?
Have you searched the Wiki?
Try using a Google search by adding "site:tech.lds.org/wiki" to the search criteria.

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Mikerowaved
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Postby Mikerowaved » Wed Jul 08, 2009 9:40 am

Also... Is the Church firewall the ONLY device on your network issuing IP addresses, with all other DHCP servers being disabled?
So we can better help you, please edit your Profile to include your general location.

Langly-p40
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Postby Langly-p40 » Thu Jul 30, 2009 3:16 pm

Just as Mikerowaved stated: If the Cisco Firewall is the only device handing out IP addresses via DHCP, you could be running out of IP's from the dhcp pool.

The Dhcp pool is set to give out 24 IP addresses.

An example of this:
Cisco Firewall with an IP address of 10.1.1.1 will have the 10.1.1.2-6 IPs be static and the .7-30 addresses be the IP's given out via DHCP
Thus 5 IPs for static, 24 for Dynamic and the .1 Reserved for the Cisco Firewall.

If your wireless Router is serving dhcp on a different subnet, then the problem may be something caused by that router.

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Enigma1-p40
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Postby Enigma1-p40 » Wed Oct 14, 2009 10:41 am

Langly wrote:An example of this:
Cisco Firewall with an IP address of 10.1.1.1 will have the 10.1.1.2-6 IPs be static and the .7-30 addresses be the IP's given out via DHCP
Thus 5 IPs for static, 24 for Dynamic and the .1 Reserved for the Cisco Firewall.


I know you used that as an example but just to be correct about the Cisco and ASA configurations, the 10.x.x.1 is reserved by the Cisco for itself 10.x.x.2 -.9
are outside of the DHCP pool that the Cisco uses to assign IP addresses. (.2-.9 are used for Access points and Network printers and such and are set statically)
the range of the DHCP pool depends on the licensed amount of users that the Pix/ASA has on it.

I would check the wireless router statistics and see if other people are connecting in the building to your wireless, if so they might be filling up all available ip addresses causing your stake presidency to get kicked

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Mikerowaved
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Postby Mikerowaved » Wed Oct 14, 2009 11:08 am

Enigma1 wrote:...10.x.x.2 -.9 are outside of the DHCP pool that the Cisco uses to assign IP addresses. (.2-.9 are used for Access points and Network printers and such and are set statically) the range of the DHCP pool depends on the licensed amount of users that the Pix/ASA has on it.

Are you sure? The only ASA's I've seen were licensed for 32 users and only had .2 - .6 (relative to the router's IP address) reserved for static IP's. Maybe they've changed the configuration since then, I don't know, but having 10 addresses reserved wouldn't leave hardly anything for the DHCP pool.
So we can better help you, please edit your Profile to include your general location.

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Enigma1-p40
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Postby Enigma1-p40 » Thu Oct 15, 2009 7:36 am

Mikerowaved wrote:Are you sure? The only ASA's I've seen were licensed for 32 users and only had .2 - .6 (relative to the router's IP address) reserved for static IP's. Maybe they've changed the configuration since then, I don't know, but having 10 addresses reserved wouldn't leave hardly anything for the DHCP pool.


Well it honestly depends. If this was a Pix-to-ASA replacement thats running the Legacy script, it is going to be just like I said in my earlier post. However if it is setup and scripted as a "Meetinghouse ASA" with General, Extended, or Restricted access, Then the configuration is a little different.

The ASA Meetinghouse assigns addresses 10.X.X.6-10.X.X.29 for anyone connecting

so .2-.5 will be reserved for AP's and network printers. and .6-.29 will be given out automatically when people connect. this means you will be able to have a total of 23 computers/ipods/whatevers connected at any given time.


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