Wireless Router configured as WAP

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dkcook2-p40
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Wireless Router configured as WAP

Postby dkcook2-p40 » Thu Mar 26, 2009 6:57 am

In various threads on the forum it talks about the DHCP and disabling it to make the wireless router a WAP.

In my router settings there is a DHCP server and then there is another option to obtain Automatic configuration - DHCP (other options are Static IP,PPPoE,...).

When you are talking about disabling the DHCP does this mean the DHCP server, the automatic configuration or both?

The set up in this ward building is similar to others with a dsl modem - church firewall - then downstream two linksys g wireless routers.

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Mikerowaved
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Postby Mikerowaved » Thu Mar 26, 2009 11:16 am

The "DHCP Server" function will assign an IP address, and other important settings, to any device that connects to the router asking for them. Since we would like the Cisco firewall to handle that function, we need to turn it off in the router. We want only ONE active DHCP server in the same LAN segment.

The other setting you mentioned relates to how the router is assigned it's own IP address, BUT, that's referring to the WAN side of the router, which you wont normally use if it's pretending to be a dumb WAP, instead of a smart router. Since no cable should be connected to the WAN port, this setting doesn't matter at all.

(Note: The following applies to a Cisco ASA 5505 firewall only.)

You should also find a place in the router's configuration menu to assign a fixed LAN IP address to the router. I highly recommend using this field. Here's how you do it. When your Cisco firewall assigns IP addesses through its DHCP service, it always skips the first 5 following its own and starts with the 6th and goes up from there. So let's say if the IP address label on the top of your Cisco says 10.111.222.49, this is what it would look like...

10.111.222.49 Cisco router/firewall
10.111.222.50 skipped
10.111.222.51 skipped
10.111.222.52 skipped
10.111.222.53 skipped
10.111.222.54 skipped
10.111.222.55 1st IP address assigned
10.111.222.56 2nd IP address assigned
...and so on.

Those "skipped" addresses are important. They allow us to put fixed IP address devices on the LAN and not interfere with anything else. Grab the first address after your own Cisco's label and put it into the "Fixed LAN" (or LAN IP) spot in your router's configuration. Now a very important part. For the MASK you always want to enter 255.255.255.224. Anything else wont work.

Do this for all of your WAP's, assigning each a different "skipped" IP address and for goodness sake, WRITE DOWN what the IP assignments are and where the WAP's are located. That way if you need to log into their menu again and make changes (like wireless key) it becomes an easy task. From any wired or wireless PC's browser, just type the WAP's address in the form of http://10.xxx.xxx.xxx and enter the username password. (You DID change the default password on the router, RIGHT? ;))
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Postby jdlessley » Thu Mar 26, 2009 11:31 am

I just noted that Microwaved provided some good information while I was composing this post. I will just add my comments to his as another way of understanding the situation.
dkcook2 wrote:In various threads on the forum it talks about the DHCP and disabling it to make the wireless router a WAP.
In this case they are talking about disabling the DHCP server function of the wireless router in the Network Address Server Settings section of the setup page of the wireless router interface. This disables the DHCP function of the router so that it merely functions as a wireless access point (WAP). The IP addresses are assigned by the Church provided firewall (Cisco PIX 501 or Cisco ASA 5505) for the entire network.
dkcook2 wrote:In my router settings there is a DHCP server and then there is another option to obtain Automatic configuration - DHCP (other options are Static IP,PPPoE,...).
You will note that the Automatic Configuration - DHCP is part of your Internet connection type. This is dependent on what your ISP requires for their network. Your ISP will tell you what setting is required to operate on their network. This is only necessary for the gateway device connected to the ISP. Since your routers are using the Church provided firewall as the gateway to the Internet, that setting in the wireless routers is in relation to the Church provided firewall. I would leave it at Automatic Configuration - DHCP for your wireless routers on the backside of your network. The IP address for the backside wireless routers will be assigned by the Church provided firewall. You may want to assign a static IP address to these wireless routers in some circumstances. For that situation you would set the Internet Connection Type to Static IP. If you do that you will have to either note the IP address in the router local IP address box or set the desired one based on what will be assigned to it in the upstream router.
dkcook2 wrote:When you are talking about disabling the DHCP does this mean the DHCP server, the automatic configuration or both?
Just the DHCP server.
JD Lessley
Have you tried finding your answer on the LDS.org Help Center page or the LDSTech wiki?

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aebrown
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Postby aebrown » Thu Mar 26, 2009 11:33 am

Mikerowaved wrote:10.111.222.55 1st IP address assigned
10.111.222.49 2nd IP address assigned
...and so on.


I think you meant 56, not 49 on that 2nd IP address....

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Postby jdlessley » Thu Mar 26, 2009 11:42 am

Don't forget to make sure the subnet mask is the same for all devices on the same LAN. Usually the default setting of 255.255.255.0 is used.
JD Lessley
Have you tried finding your answer on the LDS.org Help Center page or the LDSTech wiki?

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Mikerowaved
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Postby Mikerowaved » Thu Mar 26, 2009 12:54 pm

Alan_Brown wrote:I think you meant 56, not 49 on that 2nd IP address....

Oops. It's fixed. Thanks.
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Mikerowaved
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Postby Mikerowaved » Thu Mar 26, 2009 12:58 pm

jdlessley wrote:Don't forget to make sure the subnet mask is the same for all devices on the same LAN. Usually the default setting of 255.255.255.0 is used.

If a Cisco ASA 5505 is used as the DHCP server, then the mask of 255.255.255.224 needs to be used. I'm not sure about the required mask for the Cisco PIX.
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dkcook2-p40
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Postby dkcook2-p40 » Thu Mar 26, 2009 2:44 pm

Mikerowaved wrote: (Note: The following applies to a Cisco ASA 5505 firewall only.))


A new Cisco ASA 5505 was installed and configured a couple of months ago along with a wired line to the family history workroom.

Mikerowaved wrote: (You DID change the default password on the router, RIGHT? ;))


We did change the default password for both routers.

This is very helpful. Thanks for your assistance.

dkcook2-p40
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Follow up question

Postby dkcook2-p40 » Thu Mar 26, 2009 2:53 pm

Mikerowaved mentions finding a place to enter a "fixed LAN IP" and jdlessley mentions a "static IP?"

Are these the same?

I believe we tried to put in a static IP last night and it asked for some DNS settings. We didn't know what to put in the DNS settings. What do you put for DNS if you choose static IP?

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Mikerowaved
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Postby Mikerowaved » Thu Mar 26, 2009 3:08 pm

dkcook2 wrote:Mikerowaved mentions finding a place to enter a "fixed LAN IP" and jdlessley mentions a "static IP?"

Are these the same?

Yes. They both mean a user-settable IP address that doesn't change.
EDIT: They can also mean an IP address that your DHCP server always assigns your device, but that's a different issue.

dkcook2 wrote:I believe we tried to put in a static IP last night and it asked for some DNS settings. We didn't know what to put in the DNS settings. What do you put for DNS if you choose static IP?

You can just put your Cisco's IP address in there. You can also use the Cisco's IP address as the "Gateway".
So we can better help you, please edit your Profile to include your general location.


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