Computer hardware lifecycles

Discussions around the setup, operation, replacement, and disposal of clerk computers, not to include using MLS
wadeburt
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Computer hardware lifecycles

Postby wadeburt » Tue Dec 18, 2007 3:14 am

What is the lifecycle of the unit computer hardware? We are considering adding memory to the computers, but don't want to do that if the computers are on a scheduled release. We are over 3 years on the current hardware.
Wade E. Burt
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childsdj
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Postby childsdj » Tue Dec 18, 2007 7:59 am

The current lifecycle is 5 years and it is up to your FM to make sure that it gets replaced every 5 years. It helps to begin working with the FM in the 4th year so they can budget for it. Also, if you are still a couple of years out, I would recommend getting at least 512 for the remaining two years.

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Postby russellhltn » Tue Dec 18, 2007 11:55 am

While DJC answered the question, you might want to read over [url=http://www.lds.org/Static%20Files/PDF/STS/Troubleshooting%20PDFs/00262_000_Mar05_notice[2].pdf][color="Blue"]Policy and Guidelines for Computers Used by Clerks for Church Record Keeping[/color][/url].

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brado426
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Postby brado426 » Tue Dec 18, 2007 4:31 pm

Why does a computer ever need to be replaced unless new software is installed on it that is more demanding? Does MLS become that much more demanding as new versions are released over the years?

As long as backups are performed and more demanding software isn't installed, shouldn't a PC last forever?

Just a thought.

Russell: I'm buying you a soda on your 1000th post. :)

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Postby russellhltn » Tue Dec 18, 2007 6:31 pm

There's different schools of thought. A change of computer is probably the preferred way to introduce a new OS. Some could easily argue that a machine upgrade was required for Desktop 5.5. At least boost the memory from the 256MB minimum.

I think the bigger issue is to cycle out the computer before it's reliability takes a major dive and get the hardware upgraded before the next big thing comes down the line. If it wasn't for MLS, our stake would probably still be running 486. Just try to buy parts for that.

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Postby thedqs » Tue Dec 18, 2007 10:49 pm

RussellHltn wrote:I think the bigger issue is to cycle out the computer before it's reliability takes a major dive and get the hardware upgraded before the next big thing comes down the line. If it wasn't for MLS, our stake would probably still be running 486. Just try to buy parts for that.


That is true, I cannot find double-density (740KB) 3.5" floppies for my 8086 anymore and since it doesn't have a hard drive those are the disks to load the os and run programs. But it runs fine as a word processor and very old games.
- David

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Postby WelchTC » Wed Dec 19, 2007 8:13 am

brado426 wrote:Why does a computer ever need to be replaced unless new software is installed on it that is more demanding? Does MLS become that much more demanding as new versions are released over the years?

As long as backups are performed and more demanding software isn't installed, shouldn't a PC last forever?

Just a thought.

Russell: I'm buying you a soda on your 1000th post. :)

Brad O.

Service packs from Microsoft take up more and more resources, MLS also is getting bigger, and what has already been mentioned, equipment will fail after a certain period of time. I have an older laptop that when I purchased it, came with Windows XP (original version) and only 256 meg of memory. It could not be upgraded to more memory. As service pack 2 came out, the machine slowed to a crawl because of the additional resources taken up by SP2.

Tom

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Postby brado426 » Wed Dec 19, 2007 8:28 am

tomw wrote:Service packs from Microsoft take up more and more resources, MLS also is getting bigger, and what has already been mentioned, equipment will fail after a certain period of time. I have an older laptop that when I purchased it, came with Windows XP (original version) and only 256 meg of memory. It could not be upgraded to more memory. As service pack 2 came out, the machine slowed to a crawl because of the additional resources taken up by SP2.

Tom


That's a good point. I wasn't thinking about OS Service Packs.

My old laptop from 2002 seemed awesome at the time, but its memory is maxed out at 380MB and it now seems rather useless. My Core 2 Duo PC is my first PC that doesn't come with a parallel port and I have several pieces of custom hardware that I still need that require a parallel port. I was able to purchase PCI parallel port cards, but it is funny how something that was so common is now just an option. The same goes with 3 1/2" floppy drives... there is no need for them anymore. Remember the ZIP drive? Wow, 100MB on one disk for only around $150!! I ran out and bought one immideatly. Now, a USB flash drive that is faster and has no moving parts makes the ZIP drive look like an old relic.

I know we do end up having to replace hardware every 5 years because I guess there is no way to avoid updating the software.

I can usually get away with 3 years for replacing my PC at home.

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Computer hardware lifecycles

Postby wadeburt » Wed Dec 19, 2007 1:13 pm

As an IT Manager, it is a combination of all the things mentioned here, but also we need to bear in mind the necessity of budgeting replacements. A 5 year budget cycle allows us to properly manage hardware to the point we do not have to (unexpectedly) capitalize new hardware when the hardware fails. (I tell my clients if they make no decision on financing hardware assets, the hardware will ultimately make the decision for them)

Thanks for all the input.:rolleyes: I will start working on FM as we are 40 months into our hardware.
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Postby russellhltn » Wed Dec 19, 2007 2:30 pm

wadeburt wrote:Thanks for all the input.:rolleyes: I will start working on FM as we are 40 months into our hardware.


Ummm. When was it that the church suddenly decided to supply new computers? We got ours at that time. 2008 might be the year I have to remind FM group of what's coming.


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