Camera mounting ideas for Sony EVI-D70

Conversations around originating a webcast for conference, including cameras and mixers.
michaelfish
Member
Posts: 414
Joined: Sun May 10, 2009 3:44 pm
Location: Gilbert, AZ USA

Camera mounting ideas for Sony EVI-D70

Postby michaelfish » Mon Apr 19, 2010 7:51 pm

Here are some ideas for mounting the Sony EVI-D70 camera. If you have some good ideas, share yours.

Check out the PowerPoint show attached.
Attachments
Camera Mounting Ideas.pps
(809 KiB) Downloaded 1021 times

shanebankhead
New Member
Posts: 33
Joined: Sun Jul 19, 2009 2:35 pm
Location: Mesa, AZ, USA

Postby shanebankhead » Wed Apr 21, 2010 11:14 am

That is very interesting, thank you. I've actually been actively searching for ideas and options on this, since we are building a new Stake Center (Lindsay & McDowell area FYI, since I notice you're local) and I am trying to arrange to rough in mounting platforms for a projector and camera during construction.

Are you involved or familiar with the different installations in your slide show? If so, I have a few questions on the slides:

Examples 1 & 2 (slides 1-7)- It's obvious that these extension arms would have to be installed and removed for conference, right? It would be kind of ugly and in-the-way for a permanent install. I would love to find a retractable extention like example #1 so it could be permanently installed. I've searched extensively and haven't found anything. Has anyone ever heard of a retractable camera extention mount? I've seen them that just pop out of the ceiling, but nothing that will drop several feet.

Slide 5- Why two cameras set up in the same location? Seems like for a two camera shoot, you would want different camera angles.

Example 3 (slides 8-9)- Same as above: Why dual cameras in same location? I'm going to have a hard enough time talking the stake into buying one camera for the new building!

In our old stake center here in Mesa, we have a pretty slick setup. There are two rear screens, one on each side of the overflow, and we have drop-down projector lifts on each side. The camera is mounted on one of the lifts, so we get a pretty good camera angle when the lift is down.

I'm not sure exactly how they got that whole thing approved (they were installed before my time), and I'm quite certain we won't be able to get this sort of installation approved for our new stake center, which is why I'm exploring other options.

Thanks for the ideas.

michaelfish
Member
Posts: 414
Joined: Sun May 10, 2009 3:44 pm
Location: Gilbert, AZ USA

Postby michaelfish » Fri Apr 23, 2010 6:29 am

SBankhead wrote:Examples 1 & 2 (slides 1-7)- It's obvious that these extension arms would have to be installed and removed for conference, right? It would be kind of ugly and in-the-way for a permanent install.


The extensions and cameras are removed after the conference which requires a ladder, but it isn't difficult since all of the cables are already run. The whole setup takes only 3 or 4 minutes to get the ladder and install or remove each camera.

SBankhead wrote:Slide 5- Why two cameras set up in the same location? Seems like for a two camera shoot, you would want different camera angles.

Example 3 (slides 8-9)- Same as above: Why dual cameras in same location?


We actually used 4 cameras. 2 on the left side, 1 hanging in the center and 1 suspended on the right. There were several reasons for multiple cameras:

1) This was the first time the robotic cameras were used and although we went through extensive testing, we wanted to be sure we could switch back to the original system, in case of a failure.

2) Our Stake was being reorganized during this Stake Conference and we thought it was nice to have the ablility to quickly pan to the new Stake President when he stood up in the congregation to be recognized. It would be difficult to attempt this with the robotic cameras, but with this set-up, we were able to have one camera on the pulpit, have a wide shot of the chapel, have a wide shot of the cultural hall and still have the tripod camera free to compose a close-up of the new Stake President the instant he stood up.

3) Two other Ward buildings receive the conference broadcast. We would like for them to feel as much a part of the Stake Center's congregation and Spirit as possible. It is the goal of the STC to deliver the word of the Lord to the other Wards in such a way as to invite the Spirit the best we can. We feel that the professionalism of multi-camera broadcast with different camera angles helps convey the Spirit better and helps to keep our remote congregations connected and interested.

4) Robotic cameras are most effective presetting and memorizing 6 positions for instant recall and making slight adjustments to frame the shot. In contrast, the camera operator of the tripod mounted camera is able to deliver extremely slow and deliberate pans of the choir and frame shots almost instantly where as it takes much longer to frame (compose) a shot with the robotic cameras. We're still getting used to the joystick controller for the robotic cameras.

5) Since our Stake Center is designed with the stage at the opposite end of the chapel, we can use the mulit-camera set up for both Stake Conference and performances on the stage. Setting up the extra cameras seemed 'a given' since it was not much additional work.

Eventually, we hope to eliminate the tripod camera. It takes up space (9 chairs), is visually distracting and it takes more time to set up - dragging out the platforms, running cables, setting up the tripod and camera, etc. We need experience operating the joystick controller, mixing with the SEG, chroma-keying the hymns, adjusting the sound, etc. If anything, we've learned this can't be done by one person - it requires a dedicated and supportive team. THANK YOU STC!

michaelfish
Member
Posts: 414
Joined: Sun May 10, 2009 3:44 pm
Location: Gilbert, AZ USA

Postby michaelfish » Fri Apr 23, 2010 6:34 am

SBankhead wrote:In our old stake center here in Mesa, we have a pretty slick setup. There are two rear screens, one on each side of the overflow, and we have drop-down projector lifts on each side. The camera is mounted on one of the lifts, so we get a pretty good camera angle when the lift is down.


I'm trying to visualize the drop-down projector lifts. Could you upload a picture of this set up so I can see what you're referring to? How are the power and video cables run? What about positioning the camera? I'm also working on a retractable camera system and would like ideas too.

russellhltn
Community Administrator
Posts: 20758
Joined: Sat Jan 20, 2007 2:53 pm
Location: U.S.

Postby russellhltn » Fri Apr 23, 2010 10:19 am

michaelfish wrote:I'm trying to visualize the drop-down projector lifts.


I don't know michaelfish's setup, but a quick Google turned up this ad that I think illustrates how they work.

This one isn't cheap. Hopefully someone knows of a less expensive source.
Have you searched the Wiki?
Try using a Google search by adding "site:tech.lds.org/wiki" to the search criteria.

shanebankhead
New Member
Posts: 33
Joined: Sun Jul 19, 2009 2:35 pm
Location: Mesa, AZ, USA

Postby shanebankhead » Fri Apr 23, 2010 4:24 pm

RussellHltn wrote:I don't know michaelfish's setup, but a quick Google turned up this ad that I think illustrates how they work.

This one isn't cheap. Hopefully someone knows of a less expensive source.


Yes, that's the type of lift I am referring to, although this is a more custom installation. I'll try to snap a few pictures next time I'm over there. Yes they are very expensive, and our installation required a fairly extensive rough-in to create "boxes" for the lifts to retract into (since it is a vaulted ceiling). As I mentioned, I'm not sure how they pulled off the budget, but it's very cool! (Actually, I do have some idea, but it would take some long explanation- maybe in another post). I seriously doubt I'll be able to get this approved for another building.

Since the lifts are pre-set to lower to the exact position every time, the projector framing is always the same, and the wiring is permanent, so all we have to do is lower the lifts, turn on the camera and projectors, and we're ready to go. The control is all with the IR remotes.

shanebankhead
New Member
Posts: 33
Joined: Sun Jul 19, 2009 2:35 pm
Location: Mesa, AZ, USA

Postby shanebankhead » Fri Apr 23, 2010 4:31 pm

A couple more questions for you on this:

1. In the first installation with the long drop from the ceiling in the center- Do you get any unwanted vibration or movement because of the long extention arm? This camera can be a little bit quick and jerky with the panning if the operator is not careful. I'm wondering if the torque from the panning can cause some sway in the extention arm.

2. I'm curious about how people are controlling these in different situations. Are you using IR extenders? Or are you using the serial control?

michaelfish
Member
Posts: 414
Joined: Sun May 10, 2009 3:44 pm
Location: Gilbert, AZ USA

Postby michaelfish » Sat Apr 24, 2010 6:40 am

SBankhead wrote:1. In the first installation with the long drop from the ceiling in the center- Do you get any unwanted vibration or movement because of the long extension arm? This camera can be a little bit quick and jerky with the panning if the operator is not careful. I'm wondering if the torque from the panning can cause some sway in the extension arm.
For the camera pole hanging from the ceiling (suspended 7’), I used 3/4" EMT with a locknut fitting at the top (hides the wires and it is easy to remove for disassembly after conference) and a permanently attached compression connector at the bottom (I added a screw for safety). The setup is surprisingly stable. Only erratic panning movement makes the pole sway slightly, but it is not noticeable to the average viewer (if you look for it, you'll notice it). The camera settles after a few seconds. The camera mount does not move with normal movements.

Note: The camera is located 75' from the pulpit so even with a rock-solid mount, at extreme zoom, adjustments to nudge pan/tilt/zoom is VERY touchy.

SBankhead wrote:2. I'm curious about how people are controlling these in different situations. Are you using IR extenders? Or are you using the serial control?
We have our controls located 150' away in the library (where the satellite and distribution equipment is located). The cameras are controlled with a Sony RM-BR300 ($850) which uses RS-422 over CAT5.

If you do cannot use a joystick to control the EVI-DI70 camera, I recommend using only the camera’s 6 presets - with wide, forgiving shots. Minor camera adjustments with I/R remote or software is tedious and distracting.

Adding a second camera with a wide shot would allow the camera composition (framing) to ‘fine tuned’ before cutting to the close-up.

michaelfish
Member
Posts: 414
Joined: Sun May 10, 2009 3:44 pm
Location: Gilbert, AZ USA

An idea for motorized retractable camera

Postby michaelfish » Sun Apr 25, 2010 6:10 pm

OK, here's my idea for an inexpensive, motorized, retractable camera system:

Install a new recessed lighting fixture (housing only) in the ceiling where the camera needs to drop out of the ceiling. The camera (EVI-D70) would be attached the same way as shown in the PowerPoint (first in this post) with a 4-square electrical box supporting the camera and by a 10’ long length of 3/4" conduit (with the wires run inside). The camera and pole would be concealed inside the recessed light fixture, with the pole extending into the attic through the top of the light fixture and through a bushing. The top of the pole would be secured to a motorized garage door opener mounted in the attic to the trusses and ceiling joists vertically, instead of horizontally. The garage door limits would be set to stop at designated positions and controlled with the wall mounted 10-key pad with the proper code or even wireless remote control.

Activating the wall-mounted remote control with the proper 4-digit code would lower the camera into place and automatically stop at the designated height. Retracting the camera would be done the same way but the camera would retract into the light fixture housing in the ceiling and come to rest in its safe concealed lighting fixture as determined by the limits set into the motorized garage door.

Our Stake needs for the camera to lower 7’ out of the ceiling for the best camera angle. Since garage door openers typically have 8’ of travel, and they are designed to operate in the harsh environment of an attic, this seems like a viable solution. I’ve been in the attic and found there is 14’ vertically above the area I need to mount the camera and proper supports of framing, trusses and ceiling joists. I believe I can purchase all that is necessary to complete the project for less than $400.

I’m just wondering what kind of problems may be associated with mounting the garage door opener vertically instead of horizontally.

What do you think of this idea? What kind of problems can you foresee?

Also, I'm still trying to think of a way that I can create a cover over the recessed light housing that covers the hole when the camera retracts...perhaps you can make some suggestions.

User avatar
Mikerowaved
Community Moderators
Posts: 3131
Joined: Sun Dec 23, 2007 12:56 am
Location: Layton, UT

Postby Mikerowaved » Sun Apr 25, 2010 9:19 pm

michaelfish wrote:OK, here's my idea for an inexpensive, motorized, retractable camera system:

Pretty nifty!

michaelfish wrote:I’m just wondering what kind of problems may be associated with mounting the garage door opener vertically instead of horizontally.
Most motors and drive mechanisms (chain, track, or screw drive) don't care how they are mounted, as long as they are well secured.
michaelfish wrote:What do you think of this idea? What kind of problems can you foresee?

I would throw a safety chain/strap to the part being lowered, just in case something broke loose.

michaelfish wrote:Also, I'm still trying to think of a way that I can create a cover over the recessed light housing that covers the hole when the camera retracts...perhaps you can make some suggestions.

The easiest way would be to mount a piece of matching ceiling material to the bottom of your platform being lowered, so when closed, it fits somewhat flush with the surrounding ceiling. You can even trim the piece with some molding if you want to hide the edges.
So we can better help you, please edit your Profile to include your general location.


Return to “Webcasting”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest