MLS does not display Korean characters after Windows 10 update

Discussions around using and interfacing with the Church MLS program.
ulupoi
Member
Posts: 66
Joined: Mon Jan 24, 2011 2:21 am
Location: California, USA

MLS does not display Korean characters after Windows 10 update

Postby ulupoi » Sat Aug 06, 2016 7:18 pm

Just in case anyone else runs into this problem, this is what I had to do to fix it.

Problem: After upgrading to Windows 10, MLS no longer displays Korean text. Every Korean character is replaced by an upright rectangle.

Solution: The Windows 10 Korean language pack and associated software must be downloaded and installed.

Steps 1 and 2 are modified from instructions received from Naomi Romero at MLS Support.
Step 3 is modified from PatHig’s June 6, 2013 reply at the following URL: http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/wind ... e=1&auth=1

Follow these instructions at your own risk!

In following these instructions, don’t type quotation marks or other punctuation marks when they are just used grammatically.

1. Step 1
a. Start > Settings.
b. Click on “Time and language” in settings window.
c. Click on “Region and language” in left navigation pane.
d. Click on “Add a language” (+ symbol).
e. Click on “Korean.”
f. Now, you will be back at the window titled Settings: Time and language: Region and language. “Korean” (in Korean characters) should now appear under “Languages.” Click on it, then click on “Options.” Download all the available options for Korean (language pack, handwriting, speech).
g. Don’t click “Set as default” unless you want all Windows system labels to be in Korean. You don’t have to make Korean the default language in order to have Korean characters display properly in MLS.

2. Step 2
a. Right click on the start button and select “Control Panel.” If your Control Panel is organized by category, under “Clock, Language, and Region” select “Add a language.” If your Control Panel is organized by icons, click on “Language.”
b. Korean should be there as an option. If it is not, click on “Add a language” and add Korean.
c. Click on Korean, then click on “Options” to the far right. In the windows that opens, you will see “Korean” and under it, “Windows display language.” You might see a message about Windows Update looking for a language pack. Give Windows Update time to find it.
1) When Windows Update has finished searching, you might see, “A language pack for Korean is available for download” and under that, “Download and install language pack.” If you see that, count yourself lucky. Follow the onscreen instructions to download and install the language pack and any other downloads that it offers. Then try MLS again.
2) However, if you are on a clerk’s office computer, you will probably see a message that reads something like “A language pack isn’t available.” If so, go on to Step 3.
3. Step 3
a. This involves modifying the registry. If you are not comfortable with these instructions, stop here and get help. You can really mess things up if you do things incorrectly here. This is a serious warning.
b. Create a system restore point for your system hard drive. (Type “create a restore point” into the Windows search bar or go to Control panel > System > System protection tab > Create.) Use this restore point to try to unwind your actions as a last resort in case something goes terribly wrong.
c. Right-click the start button and select “Command prompt.”
d. At the command prompt, type: regedit
e. Click yes to open if you are prompted.
f. This opens the Registry Editor – you have to be very careful working in here, it’s easy to mess something up. Get someone else if you are uncomfortable changing stuff here. You have been warned.
g. Make a backup of the entire registry. In the left panel, select “Computer” (the highest level). Go to the File menu at the top (or right-click on “Computer”) and select Export. In the Export Registry File dialog, give the file a distinctive, descriptive name & save it to your registry backup folder. Create a registry backup folder if you don’t already have one.
h. Then, in the Registry, find the path HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\WindowsUpdate
i. Click on the WindowsUpdate folder to select it. Right-click on it, select “Export,” and make a backup of just this part of the registry. Save this to your registry backup folder, just in case you need it.
j. Click on the WindowsUpdate folder to select it. Among the keys that appear in the right panel of the Registry box, there should be one or both of the following two keys:
1) WUServer
2) WUStatusServer
k. You will see an ip address associated with each of those keys. I assume that this is the server at headquarters that they use to control updates to our custom version of Windows. We are going to inactivate those keys, temporarily, so that Windows Update is free to find the Korean language pack on the regular Windows Update servers.
l. In the right panel, right-click on “WUServer” and select “Rename.” To “WUServer,” add something like “Pause,” so the new name is “WUServer Pause.” Similarly, rename “WUStatusServer” to “WUStatusServer Pause.”
m. Right-click the Start button and select “Command Prompt (Admin).” Click “Yes” when prompted to open the Administrator: Command Prompt box.
n. In the Administrator: Command Prompt box type: “Net stop wuauserv” (without quotation marks)
o. Wait 15 seconds for Windows Update to stop, then in the Administrator: Command Prompt box type: “Net start wuauserv” (without quotation marks)
p. Now, Windows Update will work without going to the custom server.
q. Give it a minute to work, then try Step 2c again. Now, Windows Update should start working and will give you the option of installing the Korean language pack. This could take a while. Download and install the language pack.
r. When you’re done, go back to Step 1f and 2c (above), and for each, select Korean, click on “Options,” and download/install everything that is available. For me, this was a necessary step. Without it, I could display Windows system labels in Korean, but MLS still would not display Korean characters. (I restarted the computer before I did this step, but I don’t know whether that was necessary.)
s. MLS should now display Korean text.
t. Go back to the Registry Editor. Find the registry keys that you modified (in step 3l) and change the names back to what they were before. If you followed my naming suggestion earlier, change “WUServer Pause” to “WUServer,” and change “WUStatusServer Pause” to “WUStatusServer.”
u. Now, get the computer to use the custom update server again. In the Administrator: Command Prompt box type: “Net stop wuauserv”
v. Wait 15 seconds for Windows Update to stop, then in the Administrator: Command Prompt box type: “Net start wuauserv”
w. Run Windows Update > Check for Updates to make sure that it is working again.

RELipsky
New Member
Posts: 1
Joined: Sun Aug 14, 2016 11:55 am

Re: MLS does not display Korean characters after Windows 10 update

Postby RELipsky » Sun Aug 14, 2016 11:55 am

This was incredibly helpful. It worked perfectly here.

Ross Lipsky
Lynbrook, New York Stake Technology Specialist

ulupoi
Member
Posts: 66
Joined: Mon Jan 24, 2011 2:21 am
Location: California, USA

Re: MLS does not display Korean characters after Windows 10 update

Postby ulupoi » Sun Aug 14, 2016 10:48 pm

Thank you so much for letting me know.


Return to “MLS Support, Help, and Feedback”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: mckay5045 and 1 guest